OCD Books

The following books are recommended for those who suffer from OCD and other anxiety disorders or for family and friends of those suffering. You may purchase these books at your local bookseller, or click on the links below to purchase them from Amazon.com.1

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) in Adults

Getting Over OCD, Second Edition: A 10-Step Workbook for Taking Back Your Life

Jonathan S. Abramowitz (Author)

Thoroughly updated based on the latest science, this empowering workbook gives you the skills to overcome obsessional thoughts and compulsive behaviors–and live a freer, happier life. Leading OCD specialist Dr. Jonathan Abramowitz presents a step-by-step program grounded in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), the most effective treatment for the disorder. Vivid stories and numerous practical tools (which you can download and print for repeated use) help you:

*Understand how OCD affects your mind and body.
*Develop a customized plan for change.
*Find relief from distressing intrusive thoughts.
*Confront the situations you avoid–and discover a new sense of safety.
*Break free of compulsive rituals.
*Reduce anxiety and improve your relationships.

The second edition is revised throughout with cutting-edge strategies for coping with unwanted thoughts that can’t be eliminated completely, plus new learning techniques drawn from brain research. Ready to get over OCD? Your journey starts here.

Getting Over OCD The Mindfulness Workbook for OCD: A Guide to Overcoming Obsessions and Compulsions Using Mindfulness and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Jon Hershfield, MFT and Tom Corboy, MFT

I recently finished reading the book “The Mindfulness Workbook for OCD” by Jon Hershfield, MFT and Tom Corboy, MFT and I have to say I was quite impressed and have already started using many of their ideas with my current OCD clients (as well as clients with other kinds of anxiety disorders besides OCD!). Both authors clearly have a wealth of experience working with OCD and share a number of useful ideas, tips, and techniques in their book.

Essentially, mindfulness is moment to moment nonjudgmental awareness of what is happening in your mind. When you start paying attention to what your mind is actually doing, it is really quite surprising how little of the time we really are present. So often we get lost in our thoughts, react to them without thinking, and get caught up in our thought streams which can take us into some very dark and scary places which are very far from the present moment. And this entire process takes place without us being aware that it is happening – we may not be aware that we have a choice to not pay attention to our thoughts and see then for what they are as just “thoughts” and simply not respond. As one develops the ability to be more mindful it is possible to notice these things happening and the very noticing then gives us the possibility of making a different choice. If, after touching a doorknob, I suddenly feel the urge to rush to the bathroom and wash the germs off my hands, I can mindfully be aware that I’m having thoughts about my hands being contaminated but also since I am now more aware I can make a choice to either do what I’ve always done, rush to wash my hands, or I can make a choice in the moment to stay with the discomfort and see what happens. Mindfulness allows me to be aware of the “automatic pilot” and to disengage from what may have become long-standing habits of responding to discomfort by seeking immediate relief. The authors also certainly incorporate more traditional Cognitive Behavioral Treatment approaches such as Exposure and Response Prevention and cognitive restructuring, but they add to our clinical repertoire these new techniques derived from mindfulness which I think only serve to enhance the effectiveness of these more traditional approaches.

The book begins with several chapters on mindfulness, followed by a very useful chapter entitled “Acceptance, Assessment, Action”, then there are nine chapters on applying their particular techniques to specific kinds of OCD, and finally a few chapters at the end on maintaining your progress and preventing relapse. I highly recommend this book to anybody who is suffering from any form of OCD, and, in fact, anyone suffering from other types of anxiety as well.

Everyday Mindfulness for OCD: Tips, Tricks, and Skills for Living Joyfully

Jon Hershfield MFT (Author)
Shala Nicely LPC (Author)

Don’t just survive—thrive. In Everyday Mindfulness for OCD, two experts in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) offer a blend of mindfulness, humor, and self-compassion to help you stop dwelling on what’s wrong and start enhancing what’s right—leading to a more joyful life.

If you’ve been diagnosed with OCD, you already understand how your obsessive thoughts, compulsive behavior, and need for rituals can interfere with everyday life. Maybe you’ve already undergone therapy or are in the midst of working with a therapist. It’s important for you to know that life doesn’t end with an OCD diagnosis. In fact, it’s possible to not only live with the disorder, but also live joyfully. This practical and accessible guide will show you how.

In Everyday Mindfulness for OCD, you’ll discover how you can stay one step ahead of your OCD. You’ll learn about the world of mindfulness, and how living in the present moment non-judgmentally is so important when you have OCD. You’ll also explore the concept of self-compassion—what it is, what it isn’t, how to use it, and why people with OCD benefit from it. Finally, you’ll discover daily games, tips, and tricks for outsmarting your OCD, meditations and mindfulness exercises, and much, much more.

Overcoming Unwanted Intrusive Thoughts: A CBT-Based Guide to Getting Over Frightening, Obsessive, or Disturbing

Sally M. Winston PsyD (Author)
Martin N. Seif PhD (Author)

You are not your thoughts! In this powerful book, two anxiety experts offer proven-effective cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) skills to help you get unstuck from disturbing thoughts, overcome the shame these thoughts can bring, and reduce your anxiety.

If you suffer from unwanted, intrusive, frightening, or even disturbing thoughts, you might worry about what these thoughts mean about you. Thoughts can seem like messages—are they trying to tell you something? But the truth is that they are just thoughts, and don’t necessarily mean anything. Sane and good people have them. If you are someone who is plagued by thoughts you don’t want—thoughts that scare you, or thoughts you can’t tell anyone about—this book may change your life.

In this compassionate guide, you’ll discover the different kinds of disturbing thoughts, myths that surround your thoughts, and how your brain has a tendency to get “stuck” in a cycle of unwanted rumination. You’ll also learn why common techniques to get rid of these thoughts can backfire. And finally, you’ll learn powerful cognitive behavioral skills to help you cope with and move beyond your thoughts, so you can focus on living the life you want. Your thoughts will still occur, but you will be better able to cope with them—without dread, guilt, or shame.

If you have unwanted thoughts, you should remember that you aren’t alone. In fact, there are millions of people just like you—good people who have awful thoughts, gentle people with violent thoughts, and sane people with “crazy” thoughts. This book will show you how to move past your thoughts so you can reclaim your life!

Overcoming Harm OCD: Mindfulness and CBT Tools for Coping with Unwanted Violent Thoughts

Jon Hershfield MFT (Author)

Don’t let your thoughts and fears define you. In Overcoming Harm OCD, psychotherapist Jon Hershfield offers powerful cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and mindfulness tools to help you break free from the pain and self-doubt caused by harm OCD.

Do you suffer from violent, unwanted thoughts and a crippling fear of harming others? Are you afraid to seek treatment for fear of being judged? If so, you may have harm OCD—an anxiety disorder associated with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). First and foremost, you need to know that these thoughts do not define you as a human being. But they can cause a lot of real emotional pain. So, how can you overcome harm OCD and start living a better life?

Written by an expert in treating harm OCD, this much-needed book offers a direct and comprehensive explanation of what harm OCD is and how to manage it. You’ll learn why you have unwanted thoughts, how to identify mental compulsions, and find an overview of cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness-based treatment approaches that can help you reclaim your life. You’ll also find tips for disclosing violent obsessions, finding adequate professional help, and working with loved ones to address harm OCD systemically. And finally, you’ll learn that your thoughts are just thoughts, and that they don’t make you a bad person.

If you have harm OCD, it’s time to move past the stigma and start focusing on solutions. This evidence-based guide will help light the way.

When a Family Member Has OCD: Mindfulness and Cognitive Behavioral Skills to Help Families Affected by Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Jon Hershfield MFT (Author)

When someone has obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), it can affect the entire family. This book is an essential guide to help family members cope with their loved one’s compulsive behaviors, obsessions, and constant need for reassurance.

If your loved one has OCD, you may be unsure of how to express your concerns in a compassionate, effective way. In When a Family Member Has OCD, you and your family will learn ways to better understand and communicate with each other when OCD becomes a major part of your household. In addition to proven-effective cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and mindfulness techniques, you’ll find comprehensive information on OCD and its symptoms, as well as advice for each affected family member.

OCD affects millions of people worldwide. Though significant advances have been made in medication and therapeutic treatments of the disorder, there are few resources available to help families deal with the impact of a loved one’s symptoms. This book provides a helpful guide for your family.


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The Anxiety and Panic Treatment Center receives a small portion of the purchase price of books ordered through Amazon which helps support this web site.
Learn more about Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.